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GENERAL ROPE QUERIES

Rope is used for a wide variety of purposes, including:

Working at Height: Rope is essential for climbing buildings, trees, and other vertical surfaces. It is used to secure climbers to the surface and for rigging and anchoring points, it can also be used to rappel down.

Sailing: Rope is used in sailing for a variety of purposes, including rigging and sail hoisting manouevres and mooring large vessels.
Construction: Rope is used in construction for a variety of purposes, including lifting and hoisting materials, and securing loads.
Agriculture: Rope is used in agriculture for a variety of purposes, including machinery components, winching and tow applications. Vehicle Recovery: Rope is used for towing, winching and lifting vehicles of all different shapes and sizes.
Rope Care

Rope should be stored in a cool, dry place when not in use. It should also be protected from sunlight, chemicals and abrasive materials. If rope gets wet, it should be dried naturally. Rope that is not properly cared for can become weak and brittle, reducing performance and longevity.

Rope should always be used with caution. It is important to make sure that rope is properly secured before using it. Rope should also be inspected regularly for signs of wear and tear. If rope is damaged, it should be replaced immediately. For further information on the different types of ropes and their material properties visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/material-properties

The terms “rope” and “line” are often used interchangeably, but there is a subtle difference between the two. A rope is a generic term for a long, flexible material that is used to tie, bind, or secure things. A line, on the other hand, is a specific type of rope that is used for a particular purpose. For example, a sailing control line is a type of rope that is used for a particular manouevre onboard a sailing yacht.

In nautical terms, the term “line” is often used to refer to ropes that are used to control the sails and rigging of a ship. This is because these ropes are used to “line up” the sails in the desired position. For example, the mainsheet is a line that is used to control the mainsail, and the jib sheet is a line that is used to control the jib sail.

The use of the term “line” to refer to ropes that are used on yachts may have originated from the fact that these ropes were often made from long, thin pieces of wood that were lashed together. These pieces of wood were referred to as “lines” because they were used to “line up” the sails in the desired position.

For further information about Marlow’s yachting lines click here: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/

Rope is an essential survival tool and at Marlow we are proud to know that our ropes have been used by survival experts such as Bear Grylls. Rope can be used for a variety of purposes, including:

Building shelters: Rope can be used to tie together branches and leaves to create a shelter from the sun, rain, or wind.

Making fishing lines: Rope can be used to make fishing lines for catching fish.

Making a tourniquet: In the event of a serious injury, rope can be used to make a tourniquet to stop bleeding.

Making a sling: In the event of a broken bone, rope can be used to make a sling to support the injured limb.

Making a raft: In the event of a flood or other water emergency, rope can be used to make a raft to help you stay afloat.

Signaling for help: In the event of an emergency, rope can be used to signal for help by tying it to a tree or other object and waving it back and forth.

Rope is a lightweight and compact survival tool that can be used for a variety of purposes. It is an essential item for any survival kit.

Here are some additional tips for using rope in a survival situation:

Choose the right type of rope: There are many different types of rope available, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Choose a rope that is the right size and strength for the task at hand.

Take care of your rope: Rope can be damaged by UV rays, water, and sharp objects. Take care to store your rope in a cool, dry place and to inspect it regularly for signs of wear and tear.

Learn how to tie knots: There are many different knots that can be used with rope. Learn how to tie the most common knots, such as the bowline, the clove hitch, and the figure-eight knot.

Be creative: There are many ways to use rope in a survival situation. Be creative and use your imagination to come up with new and innovative ways to use rope. To select the right rope for use in a survival situation, click here for information on the different rope materials available: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/material-properties/

There are many different types of rope, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. The type of rope required depends on the intended use and characteristics required. The most common types of rope include:

Natural fibre ropes: Natural fibre ropes are made from plant fibers, such as hemp, sisal, jute, and cotton. These ropes are strong and durable, but can be damaged by water and UV rays.

Synthetic fibre ropes: Synthetic fibre ropes are made from man-made materials, such as HMPE, nylon, polypropylene and polyester. These ropes are often stronger and more durable than natural fibre ropes, and they are also resistant to water and chemicals.

Wire rope: Wire rope is made from twisted strands of steel wire. Wire rope is very strong, but difficult to work with and is not as flexible as synthetic fibre ropes. HMPE Dyneema ropes are often used to replace wire rope due to increased safety, strength and performance characteristics.

Rope is typically classified by its material, construction, and intended use. Here are some of the most common types of rope:

Nylon rope: Nylon rope is a synthetic rope that is made from polyamide nylon fibers. It is a strong and durable rope often used for outdoor applications, such as climbing and work positioning.

Polypropylene rope: Polypropylene rope is a synthetic rope that is made from polypropylene fibres. It is a lightweight and water-resistant rope that is often used for marine applications.

Polyester rope: Polyester rope is a synthetic rope that is made from polyester fibres. It is a strong and durable rope that often used for industrial applications, such as lifting and rigging.

HMPE rope: Often known as the brand name Dyneema(R), HMPE is a synthetic fibre with high performance characteristics including strength, durability whilst being low weight. Often used as an alternative to wire rope and used in small diameters in sailing applications up to large diameters for industrial lifting.

When choosing a rope, it is important to consider the following factors:

Strength: The rope must be strong enough to support the load that it will be subjected to.

Durability: The rope must be durable enough to withstand the conditions in which it will be used.

Flexibility: The rope must be flexible enough to be used for the desired application.

It is always important to inspect your ropes regularly for signs of wear and tear. If the rope is damaged, it should be replaced immediately. For further information on the different types of ropes and their material properties visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/material-properties

Here are some tips on how to care for rope:

Store your rope in a cool, dry place. Avoid storing the rope in direct sunlight or near heat sources which can damage the fibres.

Inspect your rope regularly for signs of wear and tear. If the rope is damaged, it should be replaced immediately.

Clean the rope as needed. If the rope gets dirty, it can be cleaned with a gently agitated mild soap and water solution. Rinse the soap off thoroughly and allow the rope to dry naturally.

Moisturise your rope (depends on the type of fibres used). Marlow supplies a range of coatings and lubricants to optimise the ropes’ performance.

Avoid dragging your rope on rough surfaces. This can cause the fibres to fray or cut and will weaken the rope.

Do not overload your rope or leave it underload for extended periods. Using a rope beyond its capacity can damage the fibres and weaken the rope.

Depending on the materials used, do not use the rope in harsh environments. Ropes should not be used in environments with extreme heat, cold, or chemicals.

By following these tips, you can help to extend the lifespan of your rope and keep it in good condition for many years to come. For further information on caring for your ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

Ropes should be stored in a cool, dry place. Avoid storing the rope in direct sunlight or near heat sources which can damage the fibres.  When storing your ropes, or putting them away out of season it is best to coil them neatly. To avoid putting unnecessary twist into your ropes, ensure that they are coiled correctly using a figure of 8 configuration. 

See Marlow’s tips on coiling correctly here: https://youtube.com/shorts/5RHjz0Qvbxc?feature=share 

For further information on correctly storing your ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

Looking after your ropes correctly is a major factor in their performance and longevity. Understanding how ropes are affected by external influences and learning how to inspect them will ensure your ropes are safe and will save you money on premature replacements.

SPLICES: Most Marlow ropes can be spliced, this is normally the preferred method of termination. A good splice using the recommended method should not reduce the strength of a rope by more than 10%. Take a look at our splicing instructions on different types of splices

KNOTS: A knot is the simplest way to terminate or join a rope, but will reduce the strength of the rope, sometimes very significantly. This loss is caused by the tight bends and compression found in any knot. The amount a rope will be weakened will depend on the knot, type of rope and the material from which it is made but can be up to 60%

SEWN EYE: A Sewn eye is made using an industrial sewing machine and are usually only done at the factory or by a specialist. Sewing has advantages over a splice in that it allows for easy inspection and clear retirement criteria. However, a sewn eye’s strength is a factor of the stitching pattern and thread and not related to the strength of the rope so in many cases will not be as strong as a splice. Cosmetically it is also not as attractive as a good splice.

EYE SIZE: Wherever possible the angle formed at the throat of a splice when it is loaded should be 30 degrees or less.  This means that the length of the eye when flat must be at least 2.7 times the diameter of the object over which the eye is to be used and the distance from the bearing point to the throat when in use should be at least 2.4 times the diameter.

Some materials like Aramids and HMPEs will require a larger eye with an angle at the throat of 15 degrees or less.

Inspect the rope before use. Look for any signs of wear, damage, or fraying. If you see any of these, do not use the rope.

Use the right type of rope for the job. There are many different types of ropes, each designed for a specific purpose. For example, climbing rope is designed to be strong, lightweight with good elongation, while utility rope is designed to be durable and hard-wearing.

Use the right size of rope for the load. Check the minimum break load, diameter, construction and material properties to check that you are using the correct rope for the job.

Use the right knots for the job. There are many different knots, each with its own purpose. For example, a bowline knot is a good choice for creating a secure loop, while a clove hitch knot is a good choice for attaching a rope to an object.

Use the right amount of force. Do not overload the rope. If you are using the rope to lift a heavy object, use a lifting device that is designed for the job. Store the rope properly. When you are not using the rope, store it in a cool, dry place, coiled correctly and where there is low risk of the rope and its fibres being damaged.

By following these safety precautions, you can help to prevent accidents and injuries when using ropes. For further information on caring for your rope and using it safely visit https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

Depending on the application and type of rope required, you can buy rope from various suppliers specialising in hardware, construction, garden and forestry, sailing chandleries amongst others. Marlow Ropes supply various stockists around the world, you can search for your local stockist at: https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/

TECHNICAL QUERIES

When stored correctly the shelf life of all Marlow PPE ropes and most other products is 10 years from date of manufacture.  Storage should be clean, dry, without extremes of temperature and out of direct sunlight or other strong lighting.  For some special products or applications a longer or shorter life may be appropriate, please contact Marlow for further guidance if in doubt.

Ropes may remain in service until the end of their shelf life subject to being stored in suitable conditions and passing a pre-use inspection.  For most applications it’s unlikely that a rope will reach 10 years in service before failing an inspection, in extreme cases a rope can be damaged in a single use requiring it to be retired and scrapped.  If in doubt about a ropes continued serviceability it should be retired.

Many of Marlow’s serial numbered products have the date of manufacture (DATE OF MFG) printed on the serial number label in the form MM/YYYY.  For products that don’t have the date listed in this form the date can be derived from the production batch number.  This number can be found on product labels, and for ropes supplied on a reel the batch is on the reel flange and the box label.  Batch numbers are in the form 24A1234 where the ‘24’ is the year 2024, the ‘A’ is the month (‘A’ is January, ‘B’ is February, etc) and the ‘1234’ is a number allocated by our production software at the point the production order is released.  Serial numbers are normally in the form 24A1234-001 where the ‘001’ is the individual rope within the batch.

Ropes made to EN 1891 also have a printed centre tape run with the core, this has the year of production marked on it.

ABL = average break load. MBL = minimum break load

The average is just that, the average of the test results or the predicted strength. The minimum is a calculated value, generally, we work in line with the Cordage Institute standard 1500 which puts the MBL at 2 standard deviations below the ABL. The CI standard says to test 5 samples and do the maths. This takes no account of variations between batches. At Marlow, we use the CI standard, but in addition over months and years, we accumulate additional tests of many different batches. Every so often we’ll review the data to check that our quoted numbers remain accurate. Statistics show that around 1 in 40 tests will fall below the MBL.

SWL = Safe Working Load. WLL = Working Load Limit

The SWL and WLL are often used interchangeably however there is a difference. All current standards (BS EN ISO etc) specify a WLL which is calculated by applying a coefficient of utilisation to the MBL of the product. For instance, lifting slings to EN 1492-4 have a coefficient of utilisation of 7 so to get the WLL the MBL (x 0.9 for splice if appropriate) is divided by 7. EG a Rope with MBL of 5000 kg (unspliced) will make a sling with WLL of 643kg. (5000×0.9)/7.

The coefficient of utilisation is often referred to as ‘safety factor’ although no current standards or official documents use this term. It’s the responsibility of the manufacturer to specify the WLL. The WLL is the maximum load that could be applied to a rope in use, normally this figure relates to a straight (vertical) load under normal conditions. This isn’t necessarily the maximum load in a specific application. For instance, if a rope is being used under different conditions, in a different configuration with other rated components etc it may be appropriate to de-rate the WLL. This de-rated figure is often referred to as the ‘safe working load’ (SWL).

It’s the responsibility of a ‘competent person’ to specify the SWL in use. Because the WLL and SWL are normally the same they are often used interchangeably, this isn’t strictly correct. Unfortunately, different industries use different coefficients of utilisation. Because many of our ropes are used in multiple applications it’s not always practical to mark them with a WLL. For instance, Dyneema Winch ropes are used with coefficients ranging from 2:1 or 3.5:1 for towing and 5:1, 7:1 or even 10:1 for lifting, for different applications. Similarly, a reel of Doublebraid may be used to make lifting rope by an arborist or sheets by a sailor.

For this reason, we (Marlow) don’t normally recommend a WLL for our ropes as we often don’t know what application they will be used for. If we are asked for a WLL and no other information is provided then we will use a coefficient of utilisation of 7 in line with the current standards for lifting.

There are a number of benefits to PU coating ropes, particularly UHMPE ropes.

  • Handling; the PU binds the yarn filaments together making them much less prone to being snagged, this also makes the rope stiffer and easier to splice.
  • Abrasion resistance; the PU provides a thin protective layer over the surface of the filaments this adds to the abrasion resistance, the increase in stiffness and the reduction in filament snags also improves durability.
  • Colour; UHMPE cannot be post melt dyed due to the low surface energy of the polymer, currently is isn’t available melt dyed ether. PU coating provides a means to colour ropes by applying a coating containing a pigment.
  • UV resistance; PU coating can increase UV resistance.

There are a number of different PU’s available that can be used to optimise specific properties such as abrasion resistance, stiffness, fatigue etc. The standard Marlow “Amourcoat” is PU selected to give the best all round blend of these properties for most of our ropes.

Marlow have a range of fibre and rope coatings available:

  • ArmourCoat; (see PU Coating) this is the ‘standard’ coating applied to Dyneema rope, it improves abrasion resistance, binds the filaments together, increases friction and carries colour. This coating can also be applied to other fibres such as polyester (Raptor and Arb12).
  • GripCoat; this is a ‘self healing’ PU that remains slightly tacky. This is used to reduce sheath movement in some ropes used on winches, the self healing nature may also offer benefits with respect to reducing contamination.
  • SlickCoat; this is a lubricating coating that reduces fibre friction and increases flex fatigue resistance.
  • EnduraCoat; this s a very high performing and premium polyurethane emulsion that significantly increases abrasion resistance whilst maintaining a high coefficient of friction.
  • DriCoat; a hydrophobic coating that repels water to reduce the water uptake of the rope and help minimise weight and the adverse affect of water on the rope (mainly nylon ropes).
  • XBO; this is a coating applied to Dyneema by DSM at filament level that improves flex fatigue performance.
  • Marine finish; this is a lubricating coating applied to Nylon or Polyester fibres to improve fatigue performance in a marine environment.

D:d is the ratio of the Sheave diameter (D) to the Rope Diameter (d)

We normally recommend a D:d ratio of 8:1 for most ropes including Dyneema – for example, an 8mm rope should be used on a sheave with a minimum diameter of 64mm.

Aramid ropes suffer from compression fatigue so larger ratios are required; 20:1 is typical for this type of rope.

The figure of 8:1 is a compromise between what is good for the rope and what is practical. Testing on D12 in a static condition has shown that above 5:1 the sheave is not a point of weakness in the system, as you go smaller than this some of the samples will break on the sheave rather than in the splice. As you go smaller than 3:1 all the samples break on the sheave and any smaller than this shows significant strength loss.

However the whole picture is more complicated than this as the flex fatigue rate is affected by the sheave diameter, bigger sheaves and the rope lasts longer. Flex fatigue is also affected by load, speed, rope size, amount of wrap, rope construction, fibre coatings, ambient temperature, wet or dry, and so on… The combination of all these factors makes it almost impossible to accurately predict the fatigue life and therefore impractical to isolate the sheave diameter from all of these other factors. However, the guidelines above are a good rule of thumb.

Read more about flex fatigue in our recent article on the subject.

Heat setting is the process where a rope is heated to remove the residual stress in the fibres. The fibres in a rope start life straight, after braiding and twisting they form a complex helical shape but if allowed they’ll try and straighten, this means that when the end of the rope is cut the fibres will ‘spring’ out. When the rope is heated the fibres soften and when they cool again they set in the rope shape, this means there’s no springiness when they are released. Generally a heat set rope is easier and nicer to handle.

Pre-stretching pulls the initial elongation out of a rope, both in terms of yarn elongation and constructional elongation. Pre-stretching is far more effective when the rope is heated. Marlow’s “Max” super pre-stretching process puts additional tension on the rope during the pre-stretching process and takes that rope to a higher temperature.

Most Marlow heat set ropes are also stretched during the setting process, including D12 and the cores of D2 products.

ROPE MANUFACTURING

A rope manufacturer is a company that produces ropes for a variety of purposes. Ropes can be made from natural fibres, such as hemp or cotton, or from synthetic materials, such as nylon or polyester. The manufacturing process for ropes involves several steps, including: Harvesting the raw materials: The first step in rope manufacturing is to harvest the raw materials. For natural fibre ropes, this may involve harvesting plants, such as hemp or cotton. For synthetic fibre ropes, this may involve manufacturing the synthetic materials.

Spinning the fibres: Once the raw materials have been harvested, they must be spun into fibres. This is done by passing the raw materials through a machine that twists them together.

Braiding or twisting the strands: The spun fibres are then braided or twisted together to form strands. The number of strands in a rope will vary depending on the strength and flexibility required.

Treating the rope: The rope may then be treated with a protective coating to prevent it from fraying or rotting.

Inspecting and testing the rope: The finished rope is then inspected and tested to ensure that it meets the required standards.

Rope manufacturers can produce a wide variety of ropes, including:

Climbing ropes: Climbing ropes are designed to be strong and lightweight, and they are often used in rock climbing and mountaineering.

Rescue ropes: Rescue ropes are designed to be strong and durable, and they are often used in emergency situations, such as search and rescue operations.

Utility ropes: Utility ropes are designed for general-purpose use, and they can be used for a variety of tasks, such as tying up bundles of materials or towing vehicles.

Specialty ropes: There are also a variety of specialty ropes, such as those used in firefighting, lifting, tethering floating offshore wind turbines and much more!

Find out more about the types of ropes that Marlow manufactures here: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/

There are a few different types of rope manufacturers. Here are some examples:

Natural fibre rope manufacturers: These manufacturers produce ropes from natural fibres, such as hemp, cotton, or sisal. Natural fibre ropes are typically strong and durable, but they can be heavy and difficult to handle.

Synthetic fibre rope manufacturers: Marlow Ropes is a specialist synthetic fibre rope manufacturer. This type of manufacturer produces ropes from synthetic fibres such as HMPE (Dyneema), nylon, polyester, polypropylene or aramid materials. Synthetic fibre ropes are typically lightweight, easy to handle and have various properties that suit a wide range of applications including heat and abrasion resistance, UV and chemical resistance and increased safety factors. Made from high quality materials, this type of manufacturer can make ropes for a vast range of industries.

Directly from the manufacturer: You can contact the manufacturer directly to set up a trade account and place an order. this is a good option if you need a specific type of rope or if you need a large quantity of rope.

Through a distributor: There are many distributors that sell rope from different manufacturers this is a good option if you don’t have a specific manufacturer  in mind or if you need to buy rope from multiple manufacturers. Online: there are many online retailers that sell Marlow ropes.

Retail stores: Many retail stores, such as hardware stores and home improvement stores sell ropes from Marlow Ropes. The type of retailer you choose will depend on the type of application.

Procurement Agents: Depends on the industry eg Defence, Aerospace, Energy, Construction. 

If you are a trade customer and would like to buy directly from Marlow Ropes contact sales@marlowropes.com to set up an account.  If you are an end user looking to buy Marlow Ropes for your own use, click here to search for your local stockist: https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/

Here are some tips on how to choose the right rope manufacturer:

Consider the type of rope you need. There are many different types of ropes available, each with its own characteristics.

Determine the size and length of rope you need. The size and length of the rope you need will depend on the application. Marlow specialises in producing rope for sailing, vehicle recovery, abseiling and tree climbing amongst others. Requirements vary for each type of use.

Research different rope manufacturers. There are many different rope manufacturers available, each with its own reputation for quality and customer service. Read reviews from other customers and compare prices to find the best option for your needs.

Contact the rope manufacturer directly. Once you have found a few rope manufacturers that you are interested in, contact them directly to ask questions and get more information. This will help you to determine which manufacturer is the best fit for your needs.

Consider the warranty. Some rope manufacturers offer warranties on their products. This can be a valuable way to protect your investment in a rope.

Buy from a reputable dealer. When buying rope, it is important to buy from a reputable dealer. This will ensure that you are getting a high-quality product and that you will be able to get help if you have any problems.

If you are a trade customer and would like to buy directly from Marlow Ropes contact sales@marlowropes.com to set up an account.  If you are an end user looking to buy Marlow Ropes for your own use, click here to search for your local stockist: https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/

Here are some tips on how to choose the right rope manufacturer:

Consider the type of rope you need. There are many different types of ropes available, each with its own characteristics.

Determine the size and length of rope you need. The size and length of the rope you need will depend on the application. Marlow specialises in producing rope for sailing, vehicle recovery, abseiling and tree climbing amongst others. Requirements vary for each type of use.

Research different rope manufacturers. There are many different rope manufacturers available, each with its own reputation for quality and customer service. Read reviews from other customers and compare prices to find the best option for your needs.

Contact the rope manufacturer directly. Once you have found a few rope manufacturers that you are interested in, contact them directly to ask questions and get more information. This will help you to determine which manufacturer is the best fit for your needs.

Consider the warranty. Some rope manufacturers offer warranties on their products. This can be a valuable way to protect your investment in a rope.

Buy from a reputable dealer. When buying rope, it is important to buy from a reputable dealer. This will ensure that you are getting a high-quality product and that you will be able to get help if you have any problems.

If you are a trade customer and would like to buy directly from Marlow Ropes contact sales@marlowropes.com to set up an account.  If you are an end user looking to buy Marlow Ropes for your own use, click here to search for your local stockist: https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/

Quality: Rope manufacturers have the expertise and resources to produce high-quality ropes. They use high-quality materials and construction methods to ensure that their ropes are strong, durable, and long-lasting.

Variety: Rope manufacturers can offer a wide variety of ropes to choose from. This includes ropes for a variety of applications, such as climbing, sailing, construction, and agriculture.

Customisation: Rope manufacturers can often customise ropes to meet your specific needs. This includes changing the size, length, material, or construction of the rope.

Warranty: Many rope manufacturers offer warranties on their products. This can provide peace of mind knowing that you are covered if something goes wrong.

For further information about buying rope get in touch with Marlow’s customer service team at sales@marlowropes.com

DYNEEMA ROPES

Dyneema® is a type of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibre developed by Avient. It is known for its strength, lightness, and durability. Dyneema® is often used in applications where strength and lightweight are critical, such as in climbing ropes ,sails and bulletproof vests Dyneema is made from a process called polymerization, which involves linking together many small molecules to form a long, chain-like molecule. The long chains of molecules in Dyneema® are what give Strength: Dyneema® is incredibly strong, making it ideal for applications where strength is critical. Lightweight: Dyneema® is also very lightweight, making it ideal for applications where weight is critical. Durability: Dyneema® is very durable, making it ideal for applications where durability is critical.

For further information about Dyneema® visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

Dyneema® is the strongest rope fibre in the world. It is made from a type of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibre that is incredibly strong. Dyneema® ropes are up to 15 times stronger than steel on a weight-for weight basis , making them ideal for a variety of applications, including climbing, sailing, construction and lifting. For further information about the material properties of Dyneema®

For more information visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

Dyneema® will degrade over time, however it does so much more slowly than other types of rope fibres. For further information about the material properties of Dyneema® visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

Dyneema® is a very strong material and does not rip easily. However, Dyneema® needs to be taken care of as the individual fibres are susceptible to cutting or abrasion if dirt, salt or hard objects build up within the strands or rub against the fibres for a long period of time. Hardware used in conjunction with Dyneema® ropes must be cleaned and inspected regularly as any abrasive material can cut or snag the Dyneema® fibres. For further information about the material properties of Dyneema® and how to care for the fibre visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

No, Dyneema® rope does not rot. it is made of a type of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibre that is very strong and light weight. It is also very resistant to chemicals and UV radiation.

For further information about the material properties of Dyneema® visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

Yes , Dyneema® can degrade in sunlight. However, it does so much more slowly than other types of ropes.

For further information about the material properties of Dyneema® visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

Dyneema® does exhibit creep, but to a much lesser extent than other types of ropes. Creep is a phenomenon where a material slowly deforms under a constant load. In the case of ropes, this can lead to a decrease in strength and a greater risk of failure. You can minimise creep through the following best practice: Not overloading your ropes. Inspecting your ropes regularly for signs of wear and tear. Replacing your ropes if they are damaged or if they have been exposed to harsh conditions for an extended period of time.

For further information on caring for your ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

There are a few reasons why Dyneema® is so expensive. Patent protection: Dyneema® is a proprietary material that is patented by DSM Dyneema®. This means that only DSM Dyneema can manufacture Dyneema®, which limits the supply and drives up the price.

Manufacturing process: Dyneema® is made from a type of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibre that is incredibly strong and lightweight.

The manufacturing process for UHMWPE is complex and energy-intensive, which also contributes to the high cost of Dyneema®.

Demand: Dyneema® is a popular material for a variety of applications, including sailing, climbing, and fishing. This high demand also contributes to the high price of Dyneema®.

For further information about the benefits of using Dyneema visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/innovation/dyneema/

If you are an end user you can buy Marlow’s Dyneema® rope from one of our stockists here https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/ If you are a trade customer, you can buy Dyneema® ropes from us directly by contacting our sales office at sales@marlowropes.com to set up a trade account.

YACHTING AND SAILING

There are various materials that yachting ropes are made of, but some of the most common include Polyester – this synthetic material has an excellent resistance to UV and abrasion, polyester is unaffected by water. This combination of properties means that polyester is the material used in protective cover braids as well as in pure polyester ropes. Polyester has a density of 1.38, melting point of 260 deg C and an extension to break of about 12%.

You can buy Marlow’s yachting ropes from your local marine chandlery store or rigging partner.

Browse for you local stockist or rigger on our global where to buy page: https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/

Halyards : are used to raise and lower sails usually made of strong, lightweight materials such as Dyneema.

Marlow’s products are used for various sailing applications.  Products that work well for halyards include: D2 Grand Prix 78 , D2 Club, Marlow Braid, Doublebraid.

Sheets: are used to control the sails. they are typically made of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for sheets include: D2 Racing 78 , Excel Fusion, Mattbraid, D2 Grand Prix 78

Backstays: are used to support the mast. They are typically made of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for backstays includes: D2 Racing, MarlowBraid, Mattbraid

Mooring lines : Used to tie a boat to a dock or mooring buoy.

They are typically made of a strong ,durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for Mooring lines includes: Marina Grande Dockline, Multiplait Nylon, 3 strand Nylon.

To view the full range of Marlow’s ropes for the yachting sector visit:  https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/

Halyards : are used to raise and lower sails usually made of strong, lightweight materials such as Dyneema.

Marlow’s products are used for various sailing applications.  Products that work well for halyards include: D2 Grand Prix 78 , D2 Club, Marlow Braid, Doublebraid.

Sheets: are used to control the sails. they are typically made of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for sheets include: D2 Racing 78 , Excel Fusion, Mattbraid, D2 Grand Prix 78

Backstays: are used to support the mast. They are typically made of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for backstays includes: D2 Racing, MarlowBraid, Mattbraid

Mooring lines : Used to tie a boat to a dock or mooring buoy.

They are typically made of a strong ,durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for Mooring lines includes: Marina Grande Dockline, Multiplait Nylon, 3 strand Nylon.

To view the full range of Marlow’s ropes for the yachting sector visit:  https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/

You can buy Marlow’s sailing ropes from your local marine chandlery store or rigger. 

Browse Marlow’s global sailing rope stockists at: https://www.marlowropes.com/where-to-buy/

Best ropes for Dinghy sailing include:

Excel D12: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/d12-max-78-tv78

Excel R8: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/excel-r8-r8

Excel Fusion: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/excel-fusion-ef

Best ropes for Cruiser/Racer sailing include:

D2 Racing: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/d2-racing-dr

D2 Club: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/d2-club-dc

Doublebraid: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/doublebraid-kbfl

Blue Ocean Doublebraid: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/blue-ocean-doublebraid-bb

For the full range of Marlow’s best-selling dinghy and cruiser/racer yachting ropes visit:

https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes

To help you find the right line for your chosen application use Marlow’s yachting line selection guide: https://www.marlowropes.com/yachting-line-guides/

Ropes made from polyester or HMPE Dyneema technical fibres are the strongest, lightest and most hardwearing for sailing applications.

Polyester: is a strong and durable material that isoften used for yachting ropes. It is also more resistant toUV rays than nylon, making it a good choice for ropes that will be exposed to the sun for long periods of time.

Dyneema: is a high-performance fibre that is incredibly strong and lightweight. It is often used for racing ropes, as it can help to improve a boat’s performance and in many cases will enable the sailor to reduce diameter size for the same high strengths and breaking loads. 

Marlow’s yachting range has an extensive collection of ropes made from various technical fibres and constructions to suit every sailor’s requirements.  For further information and to search for yachting lines visit:  https://www.marlowropes.com/yachting-line-guides/

To help you find the right line for your chosen application use Marlow’s yachting line selection guide: https://www.marlowropes.com/yachting-line-guides/

Marlow’s products are used for various sailing applications.  Halyards : are used to raise and lower sails usually made of strong, lightweight materials such as Dyneema.

Products that work well for halyards include:D2 Grand Prix 78 , D2 Club, Marlow Braid, Doublebraid.

Sheets: are used to control the sails. they are typically made of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for sheets include: D2 Racing 78 , Excel Fusion, Mattbraid, D2 Grand Prix 78.

Backstays: are used to support the mast. They are typicallymade of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Products that work well for backstays includeD2 Racing, MarlowBraid, Mattbraid

Mooring lines : Used to tie a boat to a dock or mooring buoy.

They are typically made of a strong ,durable material such as polyester.

Products that work well for Mooring lines: includeMarina Grande Dockline, Multiplait Nylon, 3 strand Nylon.

To help you find the right line for your chosen application use Marlow’s yachting line selection guide: https://www.marlowropes.com/yachting-line-guides/

Halyards are used to raise and lower sails and are usually made of strong, lightweight and durable materials such as polyester or Dyneema.

Some of Marlow Ropes’ halyard options include:D2 Grand Prix 78 , D2 Club, Marlowbraid and Doublebraid.

Sheets: used to control the sails. they are typically made of a strong, durable material such as polyester or nylonSome of Marlow Ropes’ Sheet options include:D2 Racing 78 , Excel Fusion, Mattbraid, D2 Grand Prix 78.

Backstays: are used to support the mast. They are typically made of a strong ,durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Some of Marlow ropes’ Backstay options include:D2 Racing, MarlowBraid, Mattbraid.

Mooring lines are used to tie up a boat to a dock or mooring buoy.They are typically made of a strong ,durable material such as polyester or nylon.

Some of Marlow Ropes’ mooring line options includes: Marina Grande Dockline, Multiplait Nylon, 3 strand ,Nylon.

RACING, CRUISING AND SUPER YACHTS

To view Marlow’s cruiser/racer range of ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/cruiser-racer/

To view Marlow’s cruiser/racer range of ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/cruiser-racer/

Dyneema:  is another high-performance fiber that is similar to Spectra. It is also very strong and lightweight and it is even more resistant to abrasion than Spectra.

Polyester: is a more traditional material for halyards, but it is still a good option for cruising boats. It is strong and durable and it is also relatively affordable.

To view Marlow’s cruiser/racer range of ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/cruiser-racer/ 

Example of Marlow’s Polyester ropes are: Marlowbraid, Mattbraid, PS12

Nylon is strong, durable and relatively stretchy which can be helpful forshock absorption. However, nylon is not as resistant to UV rays and abrasion as polyester.

Example of Marlow’s Nylon ropes : Marlow doublebraid, Blue ocean doublebraid, Multiplait.

Dyneema®: Is high-performance fiber that is much stronger and lighter than traditional rope materials. It is also very resistant to UV rays and abrasion , making it an excellent choice for ropes that will be exposed to the elements .However , dyneema can be more expensive.

The best Marlow cruising ropes are D2 Grand Prix 78, D2 Racing 78, D2 club

Strength: High-quality rope is much stronger than lower-quality rope, which means it cansupport more weight and resist more wear and tear. This is important for superyachts,which are often large and heavy vessels.

Durability: High-quality rope is also more durable than lower-quality rope, which means it can withstand more exposure to the elements and rough conditions. This is important forsuperyachts, which are often used in harsh environments.

Longer lifespan: High-quality rope lasts longer than lower-quality rope, which means it doesn’t need to be replaced as often. This can save superyacht owners money in the long run.

Reduced risk of accidents: High-quality rope is less likely to break or snap, which reduces the risk of accidents. This is important for the safety of the crew and passengers on board a superyacht.

Improved performance: High-quality rope can help to improve the performance of a superyacht. For example, it can help to reduce drag and improve manoeuvrability. This can make sailing more enjoyable and efficient.

To view Marlow’s best-selling rope range for superyachts visit:  https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/leisure-marine-ropes/superyacht/

Inspect the ropes regularly: Inspect the ropes for any signs of wear and tear, such as fraying, cuts, or knots.If you see any damage, replace the rope immediately.

Clean the ropes regularly: Clean the ropes with a mild soap and water solution. Avoid usingharsh chemicals, as these can damage the ropes.

Dry the ropes thoroughly: After cleaning, dry the ropes thoroughly. Do not leave them wet, asthis can cause them to rot.

Store the ropes properly: Store the ropes in a cool, dry place. Avoid storing them in direct sunlight, as this can damage them.

Lubricate the ropes regularly: Lubricating the ropes can help to prevent them from fraying and can also help tomake them easier to handle. Use a lubricant that is specifically designed for ropes.

Replace the ropes regularly: Even if the ropes do not show any signs of wear and tear, it is important to replace them  regularly. Ropes will eventually break down over time, and it is better to replace them before they break.

For further rope care advice visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

TREE CLIMBING

Marlow manufacturers a range of tree climbing ropes to suit single rope and double rope technique as well as traditional prusik climbing styles or the use of mechanical climbing devices.  In addition Marlow manufactures specialist tree climbing ropes with high elongation for reduced impact force in case of a fall or very low elongation for reduced fatigue when climbing.

For further information on the range of ropes that Marlow manufactures especially for tree-climbers visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/tree-work/climbing-ropes/

Dynamic ropes: Dynamic ropes are designed to stretch when a climber falls, which helps to absorb the force of the impact and prevent injury. Dynamic ropes are the most common type ofrope used for climbing, and they are suitable for a variety of activities, including top roping, lead climbing, and rappelling.

Static ropes: Static ropes do not stretch, which makes them ideal for situations where a climber needs a secure anchor point, such as when belaying a second climber or rappelling. Static ropes are also used for activities such as hauling gear and setting up rappel stations.

Twin ropes: are two identical ropes that are used together. Twin ropes are becoming increasingly popular for lead climbing as they offer a number of advantages over single ropes, such as increased redundancy and reduced wear and tear.

Half ropes: Half ropes are two ropes that are used together, but they are not identical. Half ropes are often used for trad climbing, as they offer a greater degree of flexibility than single ropes.

To view Marlow’s full range of ropes for tree climbing and arboriculture visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/tree-work/

The best diameter rope for tree climbing depends on a number of factors, including the type of tree climbing you will be ascending or descending, the environment in which you will be climbing and your personal preference.

Here are a few general guidelines:For general tree climbing, a rope with a diameter of 11mm or 12mm is a good option. This size rope is strong enough to support your weight and the weight of your gear, and it is also thick enough to provide a good grip.

If you will be doing a lot of rappelling, you may want to consider a rope with a diameter of 13mm or 14mm. this larger size rope will provide more friction when rappelling ,which can help to prevent you from slippingIf you will be climbing in rough terrain, you may want to consider a rope with a thicker sheath or made from a hard-wearing material with increased resistance to abrasion.

This will help to protect the rope from abrasion and damage.Ultimately, the best way to choose a rope diameter is to try out a few different ropes and see what feels best to you.

Select the right diameter of rope for you by searching Marlow’s tree climbing and arboriculture range at: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/tree-work/

Tree climbing rope can last for years if it is properly looked after. However, the lifespan ofa tree climbing rope can vary depending on a number of factors, including the following:

The type of rope: Different types of tree climbing ropes are made from different materials and have different levels of durability.

The frequency of use: Ropes that are used more often will wear out more quickly than ropes that are used less often.

The environment in which the rope is used: Ropes that are used in harsh environments, such as those that are exposed to the elements or that are used in rough terrain, will wear out more quickly than ropes that are used in a more controlled environment.

The proper care and maintenance of the rope: Ropes that are not properly cared for will wear outmore quickly than ropes that are properly cared for.

Ropes and hardware used for tree climbing must be inspected regularly to ensure the rope fibres have not been damaged or compromised in any way from debris or use.

For further information on rope care advice to ensure your ropes live a long and healthy life visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

There are many different types of tree climbing knots, each with its own uniquepurpose.

Here are a few of the most common tree climbing knots:

Bowline:  is one of the most versatile knots and can be used for a variety of purposes, such as tying in to a rope, creating a loop, or securing a load.

Figure-eight on a bight: The figure-eight on a bight is a secure knot that is often used as abackup knot when tying in to a rope.

Clove hitch: The clove hitch is a simple knot that is easy to tie and untie. It is often used to attach a rope to a tree or other object.

Prusik knot: is a friction knot that is used for ascending and descending ropes.

Munter hitch: The Munter hitch is a friction hitch that is used for belaying and rappelling.

For further information on knots and rope care visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

There are many different ways to anchor a tree rope for climbing. 

Here are a few of the most common methods:

Girth hitch: A girth hitch is a simple and secure way to anchor a rope to a tree. To tie a girthhitch, wrap the rope around the tree trunk and then tie a simple overhand knot.

Basket Hitch: A basket hitch is another secure way to anchor a rope to a tree. To tie a baskethitch, wrap the rope around the tree trunk twice and then tie a figure-eight knot.

Friction hitch: A friction hitch is a more complex knot that is used to create a secure anchor point. To tie a friction hitch, wrap the rope around the tree trunk and then tie a Prusik knot or Munter hitch.

Quickdraw: A quickdraw is a specialised piece of climbing gear that is used to anchor a rope to atree. To use a quickdraw, simply clip the quickdraw to a tree branch or other anchor point.

There are many different types of tree climbing knots, each with its own uniquepurpose.

Here are a few of the most common tree climbing knots:

Bowline:  is one of the most versatile knots and can be used for a variety of purposes, such as tying in to a rope, creating a loop, or securing a load.

Figure-eight on a bight: The figure-eight on a bight is a secure knot that is often used as abackup knot when tying in to a rope.

Clove hitch: The clove hitch is a simple knot that is easy to tie and untie. It is often used to attach a rope to a tree or other object.

Prusik knot: is a friction knot that is used for ascending and descending ropes.

Munter hitch: The Munter hitch is a friction hitch that is used for belaying and rappelling.

For further information on knots and rope care visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

Tree surgery rope is a type of rope that is specifically designed for use in tree care and arboriculture.

Tree surgery ropes are typically made from high-strength fibres, such as nylon or polyester, and are designed to be durable, abrasion-resistant, and weather-resistant. Tree surgery ropes are available in a variety of lengths and diameters, and are typically used for tasks such as climbing trees, rigging equipment, lifting and lowering.

Here are some of the features of tree surgery rope:

Durability: Tree surgery ropes are made from high-strength fibres that can withstand the rigors of tree care work.Abrasion resistance: Tree surgery ropes are designed to resist abrasion from tree bark and other rough surfaces.

Weather resistance: Tree surgery ropes are made from materials that are resistant to the elements, such as rain, snow, and sunlight.

Versatility: Tree surgery ropes are available in a variety of lengths and diameters, making them suitable for a variety of tasks.

Browse Marlow’s specialist rope range for tree surgery and arboriculture visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/tree-work/

Rope is used for a variety of tasks in tree surgery, including:

Climbing: Ropes are used to secure tree surgeons to trees while they are working.

Rigging: Ropes are used to secure heavy objects, such as branches or equipment, while they are being moved.

Lifting: Ropes are used to lift objects, such as branches or equipment, up or down.

Lowering: Ropes are used to lower objects, such as branches or equipment, to the ground.

Securing: Ropes are used to secure objects, such as trees, equipment or personnel in place.

Inspect the rope regularly for signs of wear and tear. 

If you see any damage, such as fraying, cuts, or knots, replace the rope immediately.

Clean the rope regularly. Use a mild soap and water solution to clean the rope.Avoid using harsh chemicals, as these can damage the rope.Dry the rope thoroughly after cleaning. 

Do not leave the rope wet, as this can cause it to rot.

Store the rope properly. Store the rope in a cool, dry place.

Avoid storing the rope in direct sunlight, as this can damage it.

Do not overload the rope. Do not overload the rope with more weight than it is designed to support. This can cause the rope to break.

Do not use the rope for applications that it is not designed for. For example , do not use a lowering line when you need a rope for work positioning.

Be careful when handling the rope.

Do not drag the ropes across sharp objects, debris or abrasive environments. This can damage the fibres or put abrasive debris into the fibres which could compromise the rope’s strength and performance. 

For further information on rope care and inspection advice visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/rope-care-advice/

Marlow manufacturers a range of tree climbing ropes to suit single rope and double rope technique as well as traditional prusik climbing styles or the use of mechanical climbing devices. 

In addition Marlow manufactures specialist tree climbing ropes with high elongation for reduced impact force in case of a fall or very low elongation for reduced fatigue when climbing.

For further information on the range of ropes that Marlow manufactures especially for tree-climbers visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/tree-work/climbing-ropes/

Safety: Ropes can help to keep tree surgeons safe by providing a secure way to climb trees and access difficult areas.

Efficiency: Ropes can help tree surgeons to work more efficiently by allowing them to move around trees more easily and quickly.

Versatility: Ropes can be used for a variety of tasks in tree surgery, including climbing, rigging, hauling, and lowering.

Durability: Ropes are designed to withstand the rigors of tree surgery work, including exposure to the elements and rough surfaces.

Cost-effectiveness: Ropes are a cost-effective investment for tree surgeons, as they can be used for many years with proper care.

Type of rope: There are two main types of rope used in tree surgery: dynamic and static ropes.

Dynamic ropes are designed to stretch when a load is applied, which helps to absorb shock and prevent injury. They are typically used for climbing and rappelling. Static ropes are designed to not stretch when a load is applied. They are typically used for rigging and hauling.

Length of rope: The length of the rope will depend on the task you will be using it for. A longer rope will give you more versatility, but it will also be more difficult to manage.

Diameter of rope: The diameter of the rope will affect its strength and weight. A thicker rope will be stronger, but it will also be heavier.

Material of rope: Tree surgery ropes are typically made from nylon or polyester. Nylon ropes are more elastic, while polyester ropes are more durable.

Colour of rope: The colour of the rope can help you to see it better in low-light conditions.

Brand of rope: There are many reputable brands of tree surgery ropes on the market.It is a good idea to choose a brand that has a good reputation for quality.

To select the right rope for tree surgery, view Marlow’s full range of ropes for tree surgery here: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/tree-work/

Using the wrong type of rope for the job. Ensure you are using a rope designed to be ‘climbed on’ as this will have been developed with the right amount of elongation in line with safety compliance. Using a rope that is too short or too long. A rope that is too short will not give you enough slack to work with, while a rope that is too long will be difficult to manage.

Using a rope that is too thin or too thick. A thin rope will not be strong enough to support your weight, while a thick rope will be difficult to handle or not pass through hardware easily.

Not inspecting the rope regularly for signs of wear and tear can lead to increased safety risks.

Not cleaning the rope regularly leading to a build up of dirt or abrasive materials that will affect the longevity and performance of your rope.

 Not drying the rope thoroughly after cleaning. Rope fibres may rot or wear easily.

Not storing the rope properly may cause unnecessary damage to your rope affecting the longevity and performance.

 Overloading the rope will lead to increased wear and safety risks.

Using the rope for applications that it is not designed for could lead to increased safety risks or put undue stress on your rope fibres affecting performance and longevity.Not using a safety harness increases safety risks.

Not using the proper knots puts undue stress on your rope fibres and increased safety risks if the knot comes undone whilst in use. 

Not being aware of your surroundings can lead to increased health and safety risks to yourself and those working around you.

ROPE FOR ABSEILING

A rope used for abseiling is called an abseil rope, rappel rope, or descent control rope. It is a type ofrope that is designed to be used for controlled descents. Abseiling ropes are typically made fromhigh-strength fibres, such as nylon or polyester, and have a kernmantle construction. The kern is thecentral core of the rope, which is made from high-strength fibres. The mantle is the outer layer of therope, which protects the kern. Abseiling ropes are available in a variety of lengths and diametersand are typically color-coded to indicate their load-bearing capacity.

Here are some of the features of abseiling ropes:

High strength: Abseiling ropes are made from high-strength fibres, such as nylon or polyester, which makes them strong enough to support the weight of a person during a controlled descent.

Low stretch: Abseiling ropes have low stretch, which means that they do not extend much when a load is applied. This is important for controlling the descent and preventing the rope from becoming tangled.

Smooth finish: Abseiling ropes have a smooth finish, which makes them easy to grip and control during a descent.

Colour-coding: Abseiling ropes are typically colour-coded to indicate their load-bearing capacity.This helps to ensure that the correct rope is used for the job.

For further information on Marlow’s abseil ropes visit : https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/working-at-height/static-ropes/

Dynamic ropes: are designed to stretch when a load is applied. This helps to absorb shock and prevent injury in the event of a fall. Dynamic ropes are the most common type of rope used for abseiling, and are typically used for rock climbing,mountaineering, and search and rescue operations.

Static ropes: do not stretch when a load is applied. This makes them ideal forapplications where a controlled descent is required, such as tree surgery and construction Static ropes are less common than dynamic ropes, but they can be a good choice for certain application.

Semi-static ropes:  are a hybrid of dynamic and static ropes.They have some stretch, but not as much as dynamic ropes. Semi-static ropes are a good choice for applications where a controlled descent is required, but where some shock absorption is also desired.

For further information on Marlow’s abseil ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/working-at-height/static-ropes/

Dynamic ropes are designed to stretch when a load is applied. This helps to absorb shock and prevent injury in the event of a fall. Dynamic ropes are the most common type of rope used for abseiling, and are typically used for rock climbing,mountaineering, and search and rescue operations.

Static ropes do not stretch when a load is applied. This makes them ideal for applications where a controlled descent is required, such as rope access and construction work positioning.

Using the wrong type of rope for a specific application: There are two main types of ropes used for abseiling: dynamic and static.Not using a harness: A harness is essential for abseiling, as it provides a secure way to attach yourself to the rope.

Not using a belay device: A belay device is a piece of equipment that helps to control your descent.Not tying the correct knots: There are many different knots that can be used for abseiling. The correct knot for the job will depend on the specific application.

Not inspecting the rope regularly.

Not using the rope for applications that it is not designed for: For example, do not use a ropedesigned for rock climbing for tree surgery.Not being aware of your surroundings.

Not using the proper safety equipment: Abseiling safety equipment includes a harness, belay device, helmet, and gloves.

Not being trained and certified: Abseiling is a skill that should be learned from a qualified instructor

Diameter: The diameter of the rope will affect its strength and weight.A thicker rope will be stronger, but it will also be heavier.

Length: The length of the rope will depend on the height of the descent.

Material: Abseiling ropes are typically made from nylon or polyester. Nylon ropes are more elastic, while polyester ropes are more hard-wearing and durable.

Colour: Abseiling ropes are typically colour-coded to indicate their load-bearing capacity. This helps to ensure that the correct rope is used for the job.

Application: The type of rope you need will depend on the specific application. For example, a rope used for rappelling in rock climbing will need to be different from a rope used for tree surgery due to safety regulations and the required elongation.

For further information on Marlow’s abseil ropes visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/working-at-height/static-ropes/

ROPES USED IN WIND ENERGY

Rope is used in wind turbines in a variety of ways, including:

Access: Rope is used to enable technicians to safely access and inspect wind turbines for maintenance and repairs.

Rigging: Rope is used to secure components of wind turbines during installation and maintenance.

Blasting: Rope is used to secure explosives during blasting operations for foundation construction.

Lifting & craning: Rope is used to lift and lower materials and equipment to and from wind turbines.

Winching: Rope is used to winch components of wind turbines into place during installation.

Permanent Installation Assemblies: Due to the flexible properties of rope, it is often used to fix, secure or tether wind turbine and floating wind turbines to their stations or platforms.  Due to the high break load strengths that some ropes can withstand, it can also be used to keep inner turbine components in secure and fixed positions.

For further information on the different types of ropes that Marlow manufactures for the Wind energy industry visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/fibre-rope-solutions/wind-energy/

Safety: Rope is a very strong and durable material, with increased safety factors and handling benefits.  It is also easily stored and transported. 

Efficiency: Rope is a lightweight material, which makes it easy to transport and handle. It is also very versatile, which means it can be used for a variety of tasks in wind turbine operations. 

Cost-effectiveness: Rope is a relatively inexpensive material, which makes it a cost-effective option for wind turbine operations.

Environmentally friendly: Some fibres used in the construction of ropes are sustainable, which means they can be recycled or reused. This helps to reduce the environmental impact of wind turbine operations.

For further information about the ropes that Marlow manufactures for wind turbines visit : https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/fibre-rope-solutions/wind-energy/

ROPE RISERS

A rope riser is a type of rope that is used in wind turbines to allow technicians to safely access the top of the turbine for maintenance and repairs. It is made from high-strength fibres and has a low stretch rate, which makes it ideal for these applications.

Rope risers are typically made from synthetic fibres, such as nylon or polyester.These fibres are strong, durable, and lightweight, making them ideal for use in wind turbines.Rope risers are also typically coated with a protective layer to prevent them from becoming damaged by the elements.

Rope risers are typically installed in wind turbines by a qualified technician.The technician will first secure the rope riser to the top of the turbine. The technician will then attach a harness to the rope riser and lower themselves down to the work area.

Once the technician is at the work area, they can use the rope riser to safely ascend and descend.

For further information about the ropes that Marlow manufactures for rope riser applications visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/fibre-rope-solutions/wind-energy/

Rope risers are used in wind turbines to allow technicians to safely access the top of the turbine for maintenance and repairs. They are made from high-strength fibres and have a low stretch rate, which makes them ideal for these applications.

Rope risers are typically made from synthetic fibres, such as nylon or polyester. These fibres are strong, durable, and lightweight, making them ideal for use in wind turbines. Rope risers are also typically coated with a protective layer to prevent them from becoming damaged by the elements.

Rope risers are typically installed in wind turbines by a qualified technician. The technician will first secure the rope riser to the top of the turbine. The technician will then attach a harness to the rope riser and lower themselves down to the work area. Once the technician is at the work area, they can use the rope riser to safely ascend and descend.

For further information about the ropes that Marlow manufactures for rope riser applications visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/fibre-rope-solutions/wind-energy/

ROPE TETHERS

A rope tether is a short length of rope or cord that is used to secure a person or object to a fixed point. Tethers are often used in climbing, rappelling, and other outdoor activities to prevent falls.

They can also be used in industrial settings to secure workers to machinery, equipment, or in the case of the wind energy industry, rope tethers are used to connect a chain of floating wind turbine platforms.Rope tethers are typically made from high-strength nylon or polyester rope. They are available in a variety of lengths and diameters to suit different applications.

Tethers may also have features such as a built-in carabiner or snap hook for easy attachment to a fixed point.

Here are the steps on how to use a rope tether:

Choose the right tether. As mentioned above,  there are different types of rope tethers available, so it is important to choose the right one for the activity or application.

For example, a longer tether may be needed for climbing, while a shorter one may be sufficient for rappelling.

Inspect the tether.  Before using a rope tether, it is important to inspect it for any signs of wear and tear.

Attach the tether to a fixed point. The tether should be attached to a fixed point that is strong enough to support the weight of the person or object being secured.

Secure the tether to the person or object.

Use the tether safely. Once the tether is attached, it is important to use it safely. This includes being aware of your surroundings and avoiding putting yourself in situations where you could fall.

To use a tree tether, first attach the loop or attachment point to the tree using a knot such as a clove hitch or a girth hitch. Make sure the knot is secure and will not come undone under load. Then, clip the carabiner or buckle to your harness or other safety gear.

Tree tethers are used for a variety of purposes, including:

Tree climbing: Tree climbers use tree tethers to secure themselves to the tree while they are climbing. This helps to prevent them from falling if they slip or lose their balance.


Tree work: Arborists and other tree workers use tree tethers to secure themselves to the tree while they are working. This helps to prevent them from falling if they are working at heights or if they are using power tools.

A tether can be either a rope or a chain. It is a device that is used to secure an object or person to a fixed point. Tethers are often used in outdoor activities, such as climbing, rappelling, and hiking, to prevent falls.They can also be used in industrial settings to secure workers to machinery, equipment or in the wind energy industry to connect a chain of floating wind turbine platforms.

Rope tethers can be made from various materials depending on their need and the properties required from the materials used. 

Chain tethers are typically made from steel or aluminum. They are available in a variety of lengths and gauges to suit different applications. Chain tethers may also have features such as a built-in shackle or clevis for easy attachment to a fixed point.

The type of tether that is used will depend on the specific application. For example, a rope tether may be more suitable for climbing ,while a chain tether may be more suitable for industrial applications.

An anchor is a heavy object that is attached to a boat or other object to keep it from moving.A tether is a line or strap that is used to secure an object or person to a fixed point.

There are many different types of tether knots, but one of the most common is the clove hitch.

Clove hitch is a quick and easy knot to tie, and it is very secure. It is often used in climbing, rappelling, and other outdoor activities.

Here are some other common tether knots:

Bowline is a very secure knot that can be used to tie a tether to a person or object.

Figure-eight follow-through is a secure knot that is often used to tie a tether to a harness.

Reef knot is a simple knot that can be used to tie a tether to a rope or another piece of gear.

ANODE HANGERS

Cathodic protection by sacrificial anodes protects wind turbine monopile foundations against internal corrosion. A common approach is to apply suspended galvanic aluminium anodes that are cast directly on a Dyneema fibre rope manufactured by Marlow Ropes. T

he anode string is attached mechanically and electrically to the monopile above the water line, allowing it to hang in the seawater to provide cathodic protection to the monopile interior areas.

For further information about the ropes that Marlow manufactures for anode hanger applications visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/fibre-rope-solutions/wind-energy/

Cathodic protection by sacrificial anodes protects wind turbine monopile foundations against internal corrosion. A common approach is to apply suspended galvanic aluminium anodes that are cast directly on a Dyneema fibre rope manufactured by Marlow Ropes. T

he anode string is attached mechanically and electrically to the monopile above the water line, allowing it to hang in the seawater to provide cathodic protection to the monopile interior areas.

For further information about the ropes that Marlow manufactures for anode hanger applications visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/sectors/fibre-rope-solutions/wind-energy/

ROPE SPLICING

Yes, splicing is generally stronger than knotting. Splicing is a technique for joiningtwo pieces of rope together without the use of a knot. Done well, a splice should not reduce the strength of a rope by more than 10%.  This is done by interweaving the strands  of the rope together, which creates a much stronger connection than a knot.

For further information on knots vs splicing visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

A splice is the strongest method for terminating the end of a rope. When a rope is spliced, the strands of the rope are interwoven together,which creates a much stronger connection than a knot. Knots can weaken a rope by creating stress pointswhere the rope is more likely to break. This is especially true for knots that are tied tightly , as this can put additional stress on the rope. Splicing, on the other hand, does not create any stress points,which is why it is often used in applications where strength is critical, such as climbing and sailing.

For further information on splicing visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

An eye splice is a loop that is created in the end of a rope. It is often used to create a secure anchor point or to attach a rope to a piece of equipment.

Back splice is a splice that is created in the middle of a rope. It is often used to repair a damaged rope or to create a stronger connection between two pieces of rope.

Short splice is a splice that is created between two pieces of rope of equal length. It is often used to join two ropes together to create a longer rope.

For further splicing options and recommended Marlow splices visit : https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

Short and long splices are two of the most common types of rope splices.

They are both used to join two pieces of rope together, but they differ in their construction and application.

A short splice is a simple and quick way to join two pieces of rope together. It is created by unlaying the ends of the ropes and then interweaving the strands together. The splice is then secured with a series of knots. Short splices are often used for temporary or informal applications, such as tying up a boat or securing a load.

A long splice is a more complex and time-consuming type of splice. It is created by unlaying the endsof the ropes and then re-laying them together in a specific pattern. The splice is then secured with a series of knots.Long splices are often used for permanent or high-stress applications, such as joining ropes used in climbing or sailing.

For more splicing options visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

The strongest way to join two ropes is to splice them together. Splicing is a technique that involves interweaving the strands of the two ropes together, creating a much stronger connection than a knot.

For further advice and a list of recommended splices and tutorials visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

There are a few basic tools that you will need to splice ropes. These include:

A fid: it is a long, thin tool that is used to push the rope fibers apart so that they can be threaded through each other.

Fids are available in a variety of sizes, so it is important to choose one that is the right size for the rope you are working with.Scissors are used to cut the rope and to trim the excess fibres after the splice is complete.This is essential for making clean cuts, which will help to ensure that the splice is strong and durable.

A whipping needle:  is a small, sharp needle that is used to sew the end of the rope after the splice is complete. This helps to prevent the rope from fraying and to make the splice more secure.

A rope saw or hot knife: is a tool that is used to cut through thick ropes. This can be helpful if you are working with ropes that are too thick to cut with a knife.

Marlow’s range of splicing equipment and definitive guide to splicing will also provide further help and advice:https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/splicing-equipment-spl

Static ropes: Static ropes are designed for climbing and rappelling. They are made of synthetic fibres and have a parallel core. Static ropes cannot be spliced because the parallel core makes it difficult to thread the fibers through each other.

Fibre glass ropes: Cannot be spliced because the fiber glass strands are not flexible enough to be thread through each other.

Wire ropes Cannot be spliced because the steel wires are not flexible enough to be threaded through each other.


Natural fibre ropes: Ropes made from jute or sisal are often too weak to withstand splicing.

Time-consuming: Splicing ropes can be a time-consuming process, especially for large or complex splices. It takes time to learn and practice the skill of splicing.  Perfecting the skill of splicing can take years. 

Requires specialised skills: Splicing ropes requires specialised skills and knowledge.If you are not familiar with the process, it is best to consult a professional to ensure you do not damage the rope irrepairably.

Can weaken the rope: If the splice is not done correctly, it can weaken the rope and make it more prone to breaking.

Can increase the diameter of the rope: The splice will add to the diameter of the rope, which can reduce its flexibility and make it more difficult to use in some applications.If in doubt, always seek advice from a certified splicing professional or rigger.

For further advice on splicing visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

Prepare the ropes. Cut off any frayed ends on the ropes. If the ropes are made of different materials,you may want to apply a layer of adhesive to the cut ends to prevent them from fraying further.

Unravel the ropes. Unravel the ropes for about 6 inches. This will expose the individual strands of the rope.

Match up the strands. Match up the individual strands from each rope so that they are in the same order.

Start the splice. Begin the splice by threading one strand from the first rope over and under one strand from the second rope.Continue this pattern, threading each strand from the first rope over and under one strand from the second rope.

Work your way down the rope. Continue working your way down the rope, making sure to keep the strands in order.As you get closer to the end of the rope, you may need to use a fid to help you thread the strands.


Finish the splice. When you reach the end of the rope, tie off the strands with a knot. You can use a variety of knots, but a simple overhand knot will work well.

Trim the excess. Trim off any excess strands that are hanging off of the splice.

Test the splice. Once the splice is complete, test it by pulling on it. The splice should be strong and should not come undone.The type of rope and the construction will impact which splice you use. 

View Marlow’s splicing tutorials to find the right splice for your requirements for splicing advice and tutorials visit:

https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

The type of rope and the construction will impact which splice you use.

View Marlow’s splicing tutorials to find the right splice for your requirements: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/Marlow’s

Recommended splices include:

D2 Eye splice

3 strand eye splice

D2 Taper

D12 Locking eye splice

Marlowbraid eye splice

Doublebraid splice

8 strand eye splice

Arborist ropes are designed to be used in a variety of demanding applications, such as climbing trees and rigging equipment. As a result, they are often subjected to a great deal of stress and wear. Due to the safety implications, all arborist ropes must be spliced by a certified splicer or rigger.

To splice rope around a thimble, you will need the following materials:

A thimble
A fid (a small, pointed tool used to help thread the rope fibers)
A knife
A whipping needle and thread

Instructions:

  1. Cut off any frayed ends on the rope.

2. Unravel the rope for about 6 inches. This will expose the individual strands of the rope.

3. Match up the strands from each rope so that they are in the same order.

4. Thread the rope through the thimble, making sure that the strands are evenly spaced.

5. Start the splice by threading one strand from the first rope over and under the first strand from the second rope.Continue this pattern, threading each strand from the first rope over and under one strand from the second rope.

6. Work your way down the rope, making sure to keep the strands in order.As you get closer to the end of the rope, you may need to use a fid to help you thread the strands.

7. When you reach the end of the rope, tie off the strands with a knot. You can use a variety of knots, but a simple overhand knot will work well.

8. Trim off any excess strands that are hanging off of the splice.

9. Whip the end of the rope with a whipping needle and thread. This will help to prevent the rope from fraying.

Your rope is now spliced!

For splicing advice and tutorials visit: https://www.marlowropes.com/performance/splicing-instructions/

SOFT SHACKLES

An all-purpose ready-made fastening option, soft shackles are used by sailors, arborists and working-at-height professionals around the world for high tech, low weight connections.

Such as when you need to create a loop or a connection point.

To attach a load to a rope or webbing.

Such as when you need to tie down a boat or a piece of equipment.

To create a secure connection between two pieces of rope or webbing.

They are often used in situations where a knot would not be strong enough such as when you need to create a high-strength connection.

To reduce wear and tear on the rope or webbing.Soft shackles are made of a flexible material, which helps to reduce wear and tear on the rope or webbing. 

Soft shackles are generally considered to be safe when used properly.

They are made of strong materials and are designed to be easy to use.However, there are some potential safety concerns associated with soft shackles, including:

Degradation: Soft shackles can degrade over time, especially if they are exposed to harsh environments or chemicals. This can weaken the shackles and make them more likely to fail.

Improper use: Soft shackles can be damaged if they are used improperly.For example, if they are overloaded or if they are used in a way that puts stress on the stitching, they can fail.

Manufacturing defects: Soft shackles can be manufactured with defects that can make them more likely to fail.This is why it is important to buy soft shackles from reputable manufacturers and to inspect them carefully before use.

Despite these potential safety concerns, soft shackles are generally considered to be a safe and reliable way to connect two pieces of rope or webbing together. When used properly, they can provide a secure and reliable connection that can help to prevent accidents.

A shackle is generally stronger than a hook.

Shackles are made of high-strength materials, such as steel or aluminum, and they are designed todistribute the load evenly across the entire shackle. Hooks, on the other hand, are often made of softer materials, such as cast iron or forged steel, and they are designed to focus the load on a small area.This makes shackles more resistant to bending and breaking than hooks.

Yes, some soft shackles are rated for lifting. However, it is important to notethat not all soft shackles are created equal. Some soft shackles are designedfor specific applications, such as climbing or sailing, and they may not berated for lifting. It is always best to consult the manufacturer’s specifications to determine if a particular soft shackle is rated for lifting.

There may be some instances when soft shackles can come undone.  Some examples include:

Improper use: Soft shackles can be damaged if they are used improperly.For example, if they are overloaded or if they are used in a way that puts stress on the stitching, they can come undone.

Manufacturing defects: Soft shackles can be manufactured with defects that can make them more likely to come undone.This is why it is important to buy soft shackles from reputable manufacturers and to inspect them carefully before use.

The type of rope and fibre used will depend on the size and intended use of the soft shackle.  For smaller, sailing soft shackles, an uncovered polyester rope would be suitable.  For larger soft shackles needed to lift heavy loads or equipment, HMPE/Dyneema would be the best option.  Marlow manufactures soft shackles for various needs. 

Find out more here: https://shop.marlowropes.com/en-gb/soft-shackle-wss

Use a stopper or diamond knot: A stopper knot is a knot that is tied in the rope that prevents the rope from slipping out of the eye of the soft shackle. There are many different types of stopper knots, so it is important to choose one that is appropriate for the type of rope you are using.

Use a secondary connector: A secondary connector is a second piece of hardware that is used to secure the soft shackle to the load.This could be a carabiner, a figure-8 descender, or another type of connector.

Use a locking mechanism: Some soft shackles have a locking mechanism that prevents the soft shackle from opening. This can be a screw, a pin, or another type of mechanism.

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